Thursday , June 24 2021

France remains the European Champion of Taxes



France owes its first place of importance to social contributions.

This is a record that will not surprise the "yellow vests" who are protesting for heavy taxes. For the third consecutive year, France has announced the highest level of taxation in 2017, according to data released by Eurostat on Wednesday. Last year, tax revenues (taxes, duties and contributions) in France weighed 48.4% of GDP, compared to 47.3% in Belgium and 46.5% in Denmark, two other countries on the podium.

First in ranking since 2015, France saw the weight of compulsory contributions increasing by 0.7 points in 2017. Therefore, Belgium has far removed and ranks among the five countries that have increased the burden of taxation. last year, behind Cyprus, Luxembourg, Slovakia and Malta. As many countries benefit, despite this increase, very easy taxation.

»READ THIS – Taxes: reasons for anger

Taxes and social security contributions rose in fifteen countries of the European Union

Generally, taxes, taxes and social contributions have grown in 15 of the 28 European Union (EU) countries. On the other hand, they fell into thirteen countries, especially in Hungary, Romania and Estonia.

The EU average is 40.2% of GDP in 2017, 0.3% compared to 2016. Ireland remains the country with the best tax, with a mandatory collection rate of 23.5%. Extremely low on the Old continent, more than half of France.

In detail, France owes its first priority to social contributions (18.8% of GDP, compared to an average of 13.3% in the EU). As for household income taxes and their wealth, they tend to lose less in France than on average in the EU.

According to the government – which does not apply the same methodology as Eurostat – it is expected that the level of mandatory contributions this year and the next year will decrease 45.3% in 2017 to 45% in 2018 and then to 44%. , 2% in 2019. The goal of Emanuel Macron is to reduce them by one point over a five-year period.


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